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Thursday, July 10

Abject Slaves Bowing to the Failure

Sixty-two quislings bowed to the money fed to them by the telecommunications industry and groveled before the complete and utter failure who is Our Dear Leader, and voted to pass the revised FISA law that effectively erases the Fourth Amendment from the US Constitution. That was yesterday, by the way. All of our telephone conversations, email, IM conversations and any other form of electronic communication are now subject to interception and handoff to our intelligence agencies.

Well, maybe not. This is going to be before the Supreme Court soon. The ACLU and other groups are already deploying their lawyers, determined that our country will not go the way of other bright and shining examples of democracy like Russia, Zimbabwe and Egypt (where at least they don't try to hide behind pretty words like "rule of law" to cover up their actions).

Aside from the stupidity of allowing this to happen, the Congress may be astounded to learn that their popularity with the American people has sunk to 9 percent. 9 percent, bowing to 29 percent. Could the 9 percent be the result of the Democratic majority continuously kneeling to the Great Leader Bush instead of giving the Failure a whipping he'll take to his grave?

Stay tuned.

Oh, and by the way, just a mere five minutes shows an argument that telecomm immunity's unconstitutional. Article I, Section 9 states that Congress is not allowed to make any ex post facto law; i.e., a law "after the fact." In other words, if it was illegal to start with, you can't make it legal afterward and allow the perpetrator to get off scot-free.

If we allow ex post facto laws to be established in this country, we might as well relax another prohibition in the Constitution, that of a bill of attainder. Attaint Bush and Cheney, their cronies and their families, confiscate all their money and property and exile them forever from the United States.

Hey, if we're going to turn our backs on the Supreme Law of the Land regarding the telecomms, we might as well go all the way.

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